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Author Topic: Not the steamiest of clocks, but now that it's running, I'm well pleased..  (Read 3097 times)
HAC
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HAC_N800
« on: November 24, 2008, 02:00:03 am »

Accutron 214 Spaceview Clock, rescued from the trash and finally restored.. Glass smooth second hand sweep, and that cheery Accutron "HUMMMM". Solid brass, to boot..






Cheers
Harold
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« Reply #1 on: November 24, 2008, 02:14:37 am »

how is it powered? it looks very magnetized!
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rogue_designer
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« Reply #2 on: November 24, 2008, 06:20:44 pm »

Lovely HAC.

Cheery is a great word to describe the Hum too - I'll have to remember that.
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von Corax
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« Reply #3 on: November 25, 2008, 06:56:19 am »

how is it powered? it looks very magnetized!

Looks like a standard quartz movement. 'Cept those coils look big enough to make your television go funny...
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rogue_designer
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« Reply #4 on: November 25, 2008, 06:53:52 pm »

Looks like a standard quartz movement. 'Cept those coils look big enough to make your television go funny...

The accutrons are much cooler than quartz movements. They use tuning forks to drive the gearing. It's really quite spiffing.
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von Corax
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« Reply #5 on: November 26, 2008, 06:03:00 am »

Looks like a standard quartz movement. 'Cept those coils look big enough to make your television go funny...

The accutrons are much cooler than quartz movements. They use tuning forks to drive the gearing. It's really quite spiffing.

Tuning forks. I knew that. (Actually, I think I did know that. "Quartz" just didn't sound right for some reason.)
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K. D. R. Tempus
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« Reply #6 on: November 29, 2008, 07:44:21 am »

Rescued from the trash?? ::facepalm:: The things people throw out.  Undecided

It's gorgeous; congratulations on yet another spectacular restoration.
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« Reply #7 on: December 01, 2008, 03:28:46 pm »

Looks like a standard quartz movement. 'Cept those coils look big enough to make your television go funny...

The accutrons are much cooler than quartz movements. They use tuning forks to drive the gearing. It's really quite spiffing.
How does that work, exactly? (I need to get a book on clock movements... quartz, accutron, but most especially spring and chain powered!)
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HAC
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HAC_N800
« Reply #8 on: December 01, 2008, 05:44:05 pm »

For more info on how an Accutron works, I refer you to this page, lots of good info, and it will save me a lot of typing  Grin

http://members.iinet.net.au/~fotoplot/acc.htm

Cheers
Harold
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Ben Hudson, Esq.
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« Reply #9 on: December 21, 2008, 07:06:21 pm »

I think it's perfectly steamy in a non-stereotyped way, actually.
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von Corax
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« Reply #10 on: January 09, 2009, 12:40:17 am »

Here's a question which occurred to me but a few minutes ago: To what degree does temperature impact the accuracy of this mechanism?
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HAC
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« Reply #11 on: January 09, 2009, 03:24:20 am »

Here's a question which occurred to me but a few minutes ago: To what degree does temperature impact the accuracy of this mechanism?

Oddly enough, not as much as one would think, I have seen timing machine graphs that suggest that a 15 degree swing in temperature would cause a 1 second per day rate deviation.
The biggest deviation in an Accutron movement occurs when the hands both pass 12:00, as the magnets of the tuning forks exert a drag on the hands. This occurs to a lesser degree, ever hour when the minute hand cross the plane of the forks. The rate slows down, speeds up, then slows down again as the magnets affect the hand. This is easily observed  on a timing machine.
It is far easier to "build in" temperature compensation into a tuning fork than into a circular balance wheel and it's hairspring. (less expansive effects due to temperature)

Gravity affects Bulova tuning forks in only 2 orientations (tines up and tines down) compared with the usual 5 positions of good quality balance wheel watches. (Dial up, dial down, crown up, crown right, crown left). The tuning forks have almost  zero positional error. A balance wheel vibrates at usually 2 1/2 times a second, whereas the tuning fork hums at 300-360 (or more) times a second, depending on the model. Modern mechanical watches vibrate as fast as 5 times a second, in an attempt to improve their accuracy by making the balance wheel lower in mass and size, thus reducing their susceptibility to external influences.



The Bulova Accutron service manual states:

"The ACCUTRON hour and minute hands are steel. On some models, depending upon the length of these hands, the tuning fork rate changes slightly when the hands are near the tuning fork magnets. for this reason, it is good practice to set both hands in the lower portion of the dial before measuring the rate of an ACCUTRON timepiece with the  Rate Recorder."


Cheers
Harold

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Angel
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« Reply #12 on: January 13, 2009, 02:51:11 pm »

I refuse to believe you got that from the trash, Mr HAC. It's a very, very pretty clock. Anything you can use as a reference to show scale?

I've been looking at some Accutron wristwatches but they're awfully 'spensive. There's a particularly nice one I'm eyeing up on the bay which isn't too much right now, but it has a few days left on it.
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HAC
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HAC_N800
« Reply #13 on: January 14, 2009, 04:05:37 am »

I should have taken a "before pic".. It was indeed a trash find.. I simply stripped  the old lacquer off the brass, then polished and re-lacquered. The movement was ok, just needed a service. The dial was refinisjed at a moderate cost..
  As for scale, the mnvement visible is the size of an Accutron wristwatch.
On  buying Accutrons, I;d stick with the 218 models, not the backset 214 ones (parts are gettign really hard to find for 214's), and make sure, that if you need to get it serviced, that you take it to a reputable watchmaker who has experience and traing (as well as the specializxed tools) to work on Accutrons. You really need to work on them under a 20x stereo microscope.   As an example, the index wheel of a 218 movement is 2.40mm (0.095") in diameter and has 320 teeth, each of which is about 0.01mm high (0.0004") and 0.02mm (0.0008") wide. The index and pawl jewels are perfect little square blocks of synthetic ruby, 0.18mm (0.007") square and 0.06mm (0.002) thick. Each coil has 8,100 turns of insulated copper wire of 0.015mm diameter (or about 1/2000th of an inch). That equates to about 80 meters (or nearly 90 yards) per coil. The wire is about one-third the thickness of a human hair.  Not an easy watch to repair or service, if you don;t have the tools or training..

Cheers
Harold
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Angel
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« Reply #14 on: January 16, 2009, 01:54:31 pm »

Has there ever been an Accutron pocket watch, HAC?

Sounds like a relatively simple build if you have the parts hanging around.
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HAC
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HAC_N800
« Reply #15 on: January 16, 2009, 05:12:06 pm »

Bulova did make some 218 pocket watches, and you probably could make one, if you had a case of the right size, and could make the requried spacers..







They even did a hunter style:


Cheers
Harold
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