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Author Topic: Steampunk Comicbooks  (Read 26134 times)
OswaldBastable
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« Reply #150 on: July 27, 2010, 11:55:40 am »

Not steampunk, but "Predator: Nemesis", a 2 issue series from Dark Horse, had a Predator visiting Victorian London.  If I remember rightly, Mycroft Holmes and the Diogenes Club pop up in it.  There are also flashbacks to a Predator in India, attacking British soldiers in redcoats and pith helmets.  I liked it, might appeal to some of you!

I'll have to look that up, sounds interesting; I predict someone called Corporal Jones dispatches the knave with his trusty bayonet  Wink
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dan_s87
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« Reply #151 on: August 01, 2010, 02:35:44 am »

I believe the Latest Steampunk comicbook is "Captain Swing and the Skypirates of Cindery Island" by warren ellis check it out it's pretty sweet
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Atterton
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Only The Shadow knows


« Reply #152 on: October 10, 2010, 03:04:44 am »

It seems Ruse may rise from the dead. Huzzah!
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Resurrectionist and freelance surgeon.
dan_s87
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« Reply #153 on: October 10, 2010, 03:40:52 am »

My Dad just borrowed Ruse from the Library. It's totally cool!
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Captain
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« Reply #154 on: November 27, 2010, 12:36:45 am »

Did anyone already mention The Searchers?   http://www.war-ofthe-worlds.co.uk/gall_c79.htm



"The Searchers is a little known comic that brings together a host of famous literary characters and concepts, predating the similar but far more famous League Of Extraordinary Gentlemen. "

I enjoyed it when it first came out.  I would recommend digging this short series up if you can. 
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-Karl
dan_s87
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« Reply #155 on: November 27, 2010, 10:18:11 pm »

No one mentioned "The Searchers" but just looking at the cover and seeing the classic nuatilous makes me want to read it.
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Atterton
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Only The Shadow knows


« Reply #156 on: October 18, 2011, 07:34:16 pm »

There was a mini series called Batman: Gates of Gotham earlier in the year. You might be interested in the costume of the main villain.

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Dr Fidelius
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« Reply #157 on: October 18, 2011, 09:52:40 pm »

A dear friend of mine is covering Steampunk Comics on a Book of Faces page. You all might enjoy (and encourage her.)
http://www.facebook.com/SteampunkComics
« Last Edit: October 18, 2011, 10:11:34 pm by Dr Fidelius » Logged

The opinions expressed here are my own, and do not represent any other persons, organizations, spirits, thinking machines, hive minds or other sentient beings on this world or any adjacent dimensions in the multiverse.
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« Reply #158 on: December 27, 2011, 01:57:16 pm »

Two Lumps  (nice story, could do with being a spin off from the main comic though)
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maevealpin
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« Reply #159 on: June 20, 2012, 09:32:53 pm »

Here's an blog post on Steampunk Comic books I wrote for Steamed http://ageofsteam.wordpress.com/


Steampunk Comic Books by Maeve Alpin

Bryan Tallbot’s 1970’s Luther Arkwright series is considered the starting point for the modern era of Steampunk comics. It explores social and political inequities through a secret agent character, Luther Arkwright, who moves between parallels by pure force of will. The main setting is a parallel world where the English Civil War has been prolonged. Speaking of Bryan Tallbot, his Grandville series is total Steampunk. I’ll begin with it, followed by thirteen more. \

1.   Grandville by Bryan Talbot

The author and artist, BryanTablot, was inspired by a 19th century illustrator, who drew anthropomorphized characters in costumes of the period and used the pen name J J Grandville. The story takes place in an alternate world where the British lost the Napoleonic War and a Scotland Yard Inspector, a badger, investigates the murder of a British diplomat. The events of 911 and a conspiracy theory are woven into the plot. The cast is made up of animals garbed in Victorian clothing, there are a few humans now and then, maids and bell hops, who are called doughfaces, which I find hilarious. Grandville is smart, interesting, well plotted and the art is incredible.

2.   Steampunk by Chris Bachalo and Joe Kelly

The hero is Cole Blaquesmith, a poor 18th century fisherman. I love his period dialogue. He falls in love with Fiona, a kind, noble lady who helps the lower class. When she falls gravely ill, he takes her to Doctor Absinthe, a mad scientist, who promises to cure her if Cole uses the Engine, a time traveling machine, to get him books on science and other objects from the future. Cole does so but when he returns from 1954, Absinthe breaks his part of the bargain and Fiona dies. Cole buries the Engine beneath Stonehenge and in turn Absinthe rips out Cole's heart. A hundred years later, Cole wakes up in a coffin during the Victorian era to find that Absinthe experimented on him, his chest is a now a metal furnace and his right arm is a huge mechanical claw. He also discovers that London is ruled by Absinthe. There are two historical royals in Steampunk. Napoleon Bonaparte is referred to as Frances in issue six, because after Absinthe killed Josephine, Napoleon gives up his humanity to become a living computer controlling France’s weapons systems and soldiers. So he actually is France. Instead of being the queen, in this London ruled by Absinthe, Victoria works for him as an assassin until she joins the resistance and falls in love with Cole. She’s a brunette beauty, her hands are surgically grafted to her arms, and her main weapon is a metallic whip that makes one of those wonderful comic book sounds, SHRAAK. Laslo, another member of the resistance, is a very interesting character. He’s a black man who speaks with what I think of as 1960’s slang, such as “Don’t ask for details about my rumble with Faust. Don’t dig for more than I lay down.” He also wears a big Union Jack print scarf that belonged to his best friend, Rikk, who was killed by Absinthe’s assassin, Faust. 

This dark, dystopian Steampunk, alternative history, comic book series debuted in 2000 and ran for twelve issues. The dialogue, characterizations, plotting, and art are exceptionally good.

3.   Lady Mechanika by Joe Benitez

Set in 1878, in the city of Mechanika, known as the city of tomorrow. Lady Mechanika, part human, part machine, with no memories of her past, searches for her identity. Her enemy, Blackpool, a mad scientist experiments on humans, removing body parts and replacing them with machine parts. It’s pure Steampunk and has a strong female as the lead character.

4.   Ruse by Mark Waid (2nd half of the series written by Scott Beatty)

This Victorian/Mystery comic series is set in the fantasy town of Partington on planet Arcadia. Simon Archard, a Sherlock-Home-type detective uses his master mind, while  his partner, Emma Bishop, a strong woman in mind and body, does everything else required to solve crimes. The one line cover tag sums it up: He’s the World’s Greatest Detective. She’s even better. The banter between Emma and Simon is witty, wry, and hilarious. I think Ruse holds a special appeal to women and I absolutely love it.

5.   Aetheric Mechanics by Warren Ellis

This intriguing graphic novel is a Steampunk/Mystery with an alternative history setting of 1907 London. The illustrations are black and white but well done, very detailed. A Sherlock Holmes type detective and his sidekick, a doctor who just returned from the frontlines of the war with Ruritania try to solve the mystery of the Man who wasn’t there. I found the plot ingenious. It reminded me a little bit of Charles Yu’s novel, How To Live Safely in a Science Fictional Universe. Writers and voracious readers will especially love this graphic novel. I did.

6.   Scarlet Traces by Ian Edginton, Art by D’Israeli

The premise is genius. It takes place in England in the early 1900’s, just ten years after the War of the Worlds when the Martians were defeated by microscopic germs humans had been immune to for centuries.  British scientist adapt the highly advanced Martian technology to everyday life. Carriages running on robotic spider legs like the Martian vehicles replace horses and homes are heated and lighted by a version of the Martian heat ray. Two English spies take on a case of a missing girl and uncover so much more. Stempunk fans will love the Victorian/Edwardian London setting, the utilization of alien technology, and the H. G. Wells connection, as well as the dark, dystopian tone.

7.   The Clockwork Girl by Sean O’Reilly and Kevin Hanna

This is a story of star crossed lovers from two different houses. Sounds familiar? One of the two fantastic castles is built by a grafter as a monument to the science of nature while the other is built by a tinker as a tribute to the science of technology and machines. The tinker creates a clockwork girl named Tesla. You will even find two quotes of Nikola Tesla within the story. Though different, several images of the little clockwork girl and the monster boy are reminiscent of scenes from Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. As the Clockwork Girl is an obvious nod to and inspired by William Shakespeare, Nikola Tesla, and Mary Shelley it has to be good, and it is.

I fell in love with the characters, Tesla, the clockwork girl and Huxley, the monster boy. I imagine everyone who reads this will do the same. It’s a heartwarming story, brilliant in its simplicity, and it is not only suitable for adults but also children as young as grade school, say seven years old on up.

8.   Girl Genius by Phil & Kaja Foglio

The lead character, a young lady, Agatha Heterodyne, is a hapless student of Transylvania Polygnostic University. When her locket is stolen it sets off a chain of events in which she discovers she is a powerful Spark, talented at creating and repairing electrical and mechanical devices. The story involves the traditional Steampunk components of an alternative history, the industrial revolution, a wonder kid, and mad scientists. It’s a whimsical, fun, highly enjoyable                                                                                                                                                                                                      read recommended for ages teen to adult. Girl Genius has won many awards, including a Hugo for Best Graphic Story in 2011.

9.   Ignition City by Warren Ellis, Art by Gianluca Pagliarani

In a dieselpunk/alternative history, washed up space heroes live in Ignition City, a rough and rowdy settlement cut off from civilization on Earth’s last spaceport. Ignition City has a strong woman for the main character, Mary Raven, a space pilot and daughter of the famous spaceman, who stopped a Martian missile plot. She heads to the spaceport to discover how her father died and who killed him. It has colorful language and a Wild West tone. There are aliens, ray guns, and the marshal flies around in a rocketeer type outfit. It’s a fun, action packed read.

10.   Iron West by Doug Te Napel

A rugged, old west cowboy hero, Struck, robs banks, cheats at poker, lies to women with promises of marriage, and runs away at any hint of trouble. Yeah, this bad boy is a real charmer. Still when some old prospectors dig up robots, who in turn dig up a whole army of metal men that go on a rampage killing humans, our hero comes to the rescue of his woman and his town. Of course he has to, he’s set for a lynching and the sheriff gives him no choice but to help or to hang. Struck has some help himself from an elderly Native American gentleman and Sasquatch. Yes that’s right, Big Foot himself. This comic book is a blast, so much fun. Iron West will make your day.

11. Jonah Hex – Jimmy Palmiotfi & Justin Gray, Luke Ross Illustrator

“When  a man knows there’s no place in Heaven waiting on him, then he’d best be wise to cozy up to the devil. And so, Jonah took it upon himself to dispatch as many sinners as Hell could accommodate… and never look back.” The art work is well done, truly brilliant. Though Jonah Hex can be classified as Weird West, Westernpunk, or Cow punk, it is first and foremost a western about a mysterious, stranger riding into town and righting wrongs in a lawless land. In the comic book series, Hex, the wild west bounty hunter is transported to the 21st century where is fights crime as a post-apocalyptic warrior.

12.   Gotham by Gas Light by Brian Augustyn and Mike Mignola

One of DC’s Elseworld comic books, set in 1889, it features a Victorian batman. Shortly after Bruce Wayne returns to Gotham City from a visit to Europe, a murder takes place in  Gotham in the style of Jack the Ripper. After a bloody knife is found under Bruce Wayne’s bed, he’s arrested as Jack the Ripper. While in prison, he figure out Jacob Parker is the real Jack the Ripper and he escapes jail with Alfred’s help. Batman finds the Ripper just as he is about to kill his next victim. A chase ensues and they come to a stop at Bruce Wayne/Batman’s parents graves. When Bruce Wayne/Batman’s mother rejected Jacob Packer’s advances he began murdering women who resembled her, to silence the laughter he hears in his head. It also turns out that he had hired the assassin who killed batman’s parents.  Packer attacks Batman, but Gordon shoots him dead and Batman disappears into the shadows.

13.   The Amazing Screw-On-Head by Mike Mignola

In this amusing Steampunk graphic novel, the Zombie Emperor threatens the world and President Lincoln has to call on Screw On Head to save the day. Our hero, a robot head, picks out a robot body to screw his head onto, then he jumps into his rocket ship and blast off for earth. Not to spoil the plot but Screw-On-Head saves the day. Dark hues are used in the intriguing illustrations. This graphic novel uses more pictures than words to tell this wacky adventure. It’s total Steampunk and loads of fun. A simple but entertaining read with a quaint nostalgic feel.

14.   The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen vol 1 & vol 2 by Alan Moore, Kevin O’Neil Illustrator

Like fan fiction from popular Victorian novels Captain Nemo, the invisible Man, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde,  Allan Quatermain, Mina Murray, John Carter and other well known characters form a type of Victorian era justice league. Fu Manchu has stolen the only known cavorite in existence, a fictional substance created in H. G. Wells First Men On The Moon.  Professor Moriarty orders the league to retrieve the cavorite but doesn’t divulge that he plans to use it to build an airship to bomb Fu Manchu’s Limehouse lair, that explosion would also destroy London. The league triumps over Fu Manchu and Moriarty. Vollume 2, continues as the League fights a Martian invasion like the one in H. G. Wells War of the Worlds. The images are great, great choices on the colors of the drawings, rich hues which stand out. I love the night scene images, such ambiance. 

You can see that though only a few comic are labeled Steampunk, several have Victorian, Dystopian, Dieselpunk, Weird West or Alternate History ascetics. We can look forward to the future of Steampunk comic books offering even more diversity and choices for readers, but there should be something for every Steampunk reader among these fourteen comic books listed.
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gavinfuzzy
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« Reply #160 on: June 21, 2012, 09:59:04 am »

Transformers: Hearts of Steel. (Not sure if it was mentioned before)

Yeah, it was only 4 issues long (another 2 if you count IDW Infestation) but it was kinda neat. Not sure if it's gonna appeal much to everyone, but if you've at least heard of the Transformers or watched Michael Bay's movies you should be able to find it an entertaining read. Depicts the Transformers in very steampunky designs.




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GCCC
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« Reply #161 on: March 20, 2014, 03:11:52 am »

Hello, all;

I need some help with some lists I'm compiling, and followers of this thread are surely qualified to offer advice.

I'm compiling lists of Steampunk literature by format (novels, e-publishing, graphic novels, etc.) I'm encountering a lot of manga being touted as Steampunk, but I'm a bit fuzzy on their bona fides. This becomes a relevant question for both novels and graphic novels, because quite a few manga have been published as what the Japanese refer to as "light novels" (what we call "young adult" novels). As I'm making no distinction between YA and non-YA books in the novels compilation, if they qualify, I'll need to include the relevant light novels.

I've no problem whatsoever including the Fullmetal Alchemist series, since it exists in what I consider to be a very steampunk world (and they treat the woo-woo stuff as science). I've tentatively included the Trigun series as I've read it described as a sort of Weird West tale (although with what little I've seen of the anime, I can see no traces of Steampunkery). The Legend of Korra, on the other hand, along with its parent series Avatar, have appeared on some Steampunk lists, and I can't see why--yet. Apart from one character, I'm not certain Samurai 7 belongs on the list, either. Read or Die and its sequel series Read or Dream also has, to my mind, questionable Steampunk credentials. (Note also, that I have already been scouring the board for intel, and many of these manga were mentioned in other threads on Textual.)

So, before I go about adding these manga and their light novel adaptations series to the list, I would really appreciate some feedback on whether or not any of these belong on a Steampunk list.

(To see the work-in-progress novels list, see:  http://brassgoggles.co.uk/forum/index.php/topic,42449.0.html )

Thanking you in advance for your assistance, I remain,
GCCC
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