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Author Topic: The next watch in the pile - with luck - 1940's Lord Elgin 'driver"  (Read 4021 times)
HAC
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« on: November 06, 2008, 11:37:02 pm »

Currently working a deal on a 21J Lord Elgin  "drivers watch".  The drievrs watch was a style that gained popularity in the 1940's. The trick to them (in most cases) was  having the strap lugs hinged, so that the watch could be worn on the top of the wrist, or, when driving, on the side of the wrist, for easier reading.
This one is not common, being the higher grade Lord Elgin with the 21J 559 movement. Looks like all it really needs is a little TLC..







Cheers
Harold

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Jake of All Trades
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« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2008, 02:06:42 am »

Nifty!  Being the lazy *ahem* efficient person that I am, I always thought a side-of-the-wrist watch was a good idea.

Spiffingly simple face design too--and I'm a sucker for chunky crystals...
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Rowan of Rin
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« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2008, 03:40:34 am »

I also love rounded crystals, especially those found on the 17th and 18th Century "Onion" watches.

Great find Harold, very interesting ideas here..

P.S: Good to see you back Mr. All Trades!
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Alptraum
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« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2008, 12:27:52 am »

What does the '21 jewels' thing mean on the movement?
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rogue_designer
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« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2008, 01:17:57 am »

What does the '21 jewels' thing mean on the movement?

The jewels refer to ruby or sapphires used as bearings for some of the gears. (The red crystals you see in pictures of the movement, above, are some of them). These allow for tighter tolerances, and better wear characteristics, among other things.

Thus - as a rule, but not always, the more "jewels" in a movement, the higher its quality.
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Alptraum
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« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2008, 06:59:31 pm »

do you mean that the rubies are directly being used as a lubricant?
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rogue_designer
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« Reply #6 on: November 17, 2008, 07:34:30 pm »

Pretty much. There is some very (very very) light oil within the mechanism, but many are for the most part dry. But a polished ruby is a very hard, smooth surface and against a metal gear pinion, is pretty nearly frictionless.
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HAC
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« Reply #7 on: November 17, 2008, 07:40:44 pm »

The jewels used in watches are usually rubies, sapphires (which are chemically the same as rubies), garnets and diamonds. After around 1900, most of the rubies used were synthetic. Before 1900, the jewels were either from stones that were too small or had too many flaws to be used in jewelry. In either case, they really weren't that costly. There is often a correlation between the price of the watch and number of jewels, but the jewels themselves are not the cause of this higher price.

Reducing friction is an extremely important goal in watchmaking. Jewels have two important properties that help reduce friction. First, they can be made to be very smooth, and therefore they let the metal parts slide easily. Secondly, they are very hard and therefore don't wear down very quickly. The gears in a watch are carefully designed so that the teeth roll on each other, rather than sliding. If the axle of a gear wears away the hole that it sit in, the gear will shift. That means the teeth will no longer roll on each other and therefore friction will be increased.

There are several different types of jewels used in a watch, the most common are:

Hole Jewels:   These are donut shaped jewels that fit over the gear axles (in watch lingo, the wheel arbors).
Cap Jewels:   These are flat jewels that are placed on the ends of the axles (arbors).
Pallet Jewels:   These are brick shaped jewels on the pallet fork that alternately engage and release the escape wheel. The escape wheel is the gear with funny "boot" shaped teeth.
Roller Jewel:   This jewel is on the large balance wheel that swings back and forth. It engages with the pallet fork on the end opposite of the pallet jewels.
The jewels are carefully shaped so that the capillary action of the oil causes the oil to be drawn toward the gear arbors instead of spreading out where it doesn't do any good.

Cheers
Harold
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Jake of All Trades
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« Reply #8 on: November 17, 2008, 08:49:47 pm »

P.S: Good to see you back Mr. All Trades!

Thanks, mate!
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Sir L. Cuilein
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« Reply #9 on: June 15, 2009, 08:08:34 am »

Any chance you'll post some pics of that Lord Elgin?
I'd sure like to admire it...
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Alptraum
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« Reply #10 on: June 15, 2009, 07:27:59 pm »

Hmm.. I last saw this thread 7 months ago.. things must be quiet in the chronoautomata thread..
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HAC
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« Reply #11 on: June 16, 2009, 02:02:13 am »

Any chance you'll post some pics of that Lord Elgin?
I'd sure like to admire it...
Sadly enough, this one never made it to me, was mailed, but "lost in transit", and the shipper didn;t send it tracked or insured..
Cheers
Harold
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Sir L. Cuilein
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« Reply #12 on: June 16, 2009, 07:53:24 pm »

My deepest condolences sir...
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