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Author Topic: Fusee anyone?  (Read 4484 times)
HAC
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HAC_N800
« on: November 05, 2008, 06:32:53 pm »

Sigh.. I really have to get one of these. Any watch with a chain drive just has to be cool..








Cheers
Harold
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« Reply #1 on: November 05, 2008, 06:36:43 pm »

this is something beautiful...
you say it has a chain drive? rather interesting.
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HAC
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HAC_N800
« Reply #2 on: November 05, 2008, 06:51:12 pm »

this is something beautiful...
you say it has a chain drive? rather interesting.


One of the problems with a manispring drive in a watch is that the power delevery is not constant across the wind range (i.e. there is more torque out at full wind, and less at the end), and that would affect the timekeeping rather badly. To get around this, the fusee, or chain drive was invented.
In a fusee clock, the barrel turns the fusee by pulling on the chain, and the fusee turns the clock's gears.

When the mainspring is wound up  all the chain is wrapped around the fusee from bottom to top, and the end going to the barrel comes off the narrow top end of the fusee. So the strong pull of the wound up mainspring is applied to the small end of the fusee, and the torque on the fusee is reduced by the small lever arm of the fusee radius.
As the clock runs, the chain is unwound from the fusee from top to bottom and wound on the barrel.
As the mainspring runs down, more of the chain is wrapped on the barrel, and the chain going to the barrel comes off the wide bottom grooves of the fusee. Now the weaker pull of the mainspring is applied to the larger radius of the bottom of the fusee. The larger lever arm compensates for the weaker force of the spring, keeping the drive force constant.



The chain has incredibly small links. My wathcmaker used to repair these, and told me he would use a piece of thick paper as a spacer when assembling a link, then burn out the paper after assembly..

Cheers
Harold
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Marrock
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« Reply #3 on: November 05, 2008, 07:12:34 pm »

The shame of it is all that beautiful clockwork has to remain hidden inside the case.
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Lady Penelope
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« Reply #4 on: November 05, 2008, 07:57:17 pm »

That's quite lovely, Harold!  I don't believe I've ever seen that kind of watch drive.  I'd love to examine one up close.  *wistful sigh*
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HAC
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« Reply #5 on: November 05, 2008, 08:15:47 pm »

The shame of it is all that beautiful clockwork has to remain hidden inside the case.

True, but at least that keeps the dust out!..
The design does not lend itself to a display back, being a full plate movement, alas..

Cheers
Harold
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Dr C P Hornfels
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« Reply #6 on: November 05, 2008, 08:16:11 pm »

I was having a chat to my dad the other day turns out he has an 1850's english silver fusee pocket watch. When i'm next not 100 miles from him I shall see if I can get photos. Also turns out he has a cuckoo clock with a fusee movement, only on the cuckoo. We reckon this is to keep the cuckoo at the same pitch.
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Mechanism Man
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« Reply #7 on: November 07, 2008, 09:41:28 pm »

I know that this has been mentioned before, but this where fusees have got to today. I need a pay rise...
http://www.cabestan.ch/en/
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HAC
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HAC_N800
« Reply #8 on: November 08, 2008, 07:07:49 am »

I can find quite a few early English fusees in the $75 range.... BUT the cabeat is always the dislcaimer "Chain is broken" sigh...

Cheers
Harold
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Sir Nikolas Vendigroth
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« Reply #9 on: November 08, 2008, 03:53:39 pm »

I could never use a fusee for just the same reason. The thought of what might happen if I wound it is a major turn-off to me.
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rogue_designer
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« Reply #10 on: November 08, 2008, 08:21:24 pm »

I do like about the cabestan - that they have a mechanism to relieve stress on the chain while winding.

I'm actually playing with some thin sheet copper now - just dorking around the idea of an art project using small chains. The paper trick sounds just the ticket for their construction.
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« Reply #11 on: November 10, 2008, 06:05:01 pm »

I have a box full of elglish (and 1 elgin) fusee's, I have 2 chains (don't know if they're complete, but they're pretty long and appear to be in good shape, even if they are off the watches), but alas, they are all missing balances.
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« Reply #12 on: November 11, 2008, 06:05:17 am »

thank you greatly for the information and diagram Mr.Harold. that was quite fascinating Grin
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HAC
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« Reply #13 on: November 11, 2008, 06:06:42 am »

No problem... Any watch questions, feel free to ask, and I'll try to answer...

Cheers
Harold
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SaintSeptum
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« Reply #14 on: November 16, 2008, 08:14:02 am »

interesting..... so basically a Fusee is like a transmission for the mainspring, changing the "gearing" as it winds down?

*sigh*...then someone invented the quartz movement and all this ingenuity went out the window....

Interesting bit of chronoloigical history though. Thanks HAC :-D
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« Reply #15 on: November 16, 2008, 04:10:09 pm »

Is it just me, or does this bare some similarity to modern CVT transmissions? Altering the torque by changing the shape of one of the drive gears... Funny how this stuff comes around.

Then again, I think DaVinci invented a CVT..
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HAC
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« Reply #16 on: November 17, 2008, 12:11:14 am »

"Everything old is new again"

Cheers
Harold
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HAC
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HAC_N800
« Reply #17 on: February 26, 2009, 12:26:08 am »

I'm sorry, but after the first line, I really have no clue as to what you mean or are asking.  Are you referring to round business cards? If so, no I have never seen one. Most watchmakers are rather conservative folks, and all of the business cards I have from watchmakers are rather, well, ordinary..

Cheers
Harold
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E.A. Claringbold
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« Reply #18 on: February 26, 2009, 12:32:25 am »

o___o

Oh gawd- it's so pretty~
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SaintSeptum
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« Reply #19 on: February 26, 2009, 01:19:31 am »

Is it just me, or does this bare some similarity to modern CVT transmissions? Altering the torque by changing the shape of one of the drive gears... Funny how this stuff comes around.

Interestinglky, I've been reading a history of timekeeping, and as it turns out the differential gear, clutch, universal joint, roller chain (the fusee was the first application of this) and several other now-common mechanical gadgets all had their start in watch and clock making.

Stuff comes around indeed :-)
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HAC
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« Reply #20 on: February 26, 2009, 02:19:16 am »

harold



   they were round business cards left inside the watch case by the watch repair man


they are different but collectable all the same

To my mind, thats NOT a good idea. I;d only go for that in a hinged case with cuvette, as you could put the card bewteen the case and cuvette. Card next to a movement seesm to be a bad idea to me, too much chance for dust, intereferance, removing lube, etc..
 Still no accounting for older business practices..

Cheers
Harold
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Rowan of Rin
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« Reply #21 on: February 26, 2009, 06:38:33 am »

Harold; he means a watch paper, often left in to show who last repaired the watch. I usually see them associated with older watches, usually late 1700's to early 1800's.
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HAC
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HAC_N800
« Reply #22 on: February 26, 2009, 05:01:53 pm »

Then why didn't he say so?  I swear his posts border on gibberish at times.
Watch papers from that era , I have seen, and that practice was superceded by the now common "scratch"
Cheers
Harold
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Mr. Boltneck
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« Reply #23 on: February 27, 2009, 09:01:00 pm »

Actually, can anyone think of an earlier device that has this kind of 2-axis machining? At least I assume that two coupled leadscrews were involved, one for axial feed, one radial. Or is there some other method? I am trying to hunt up more information on fusee-cutting engines, although I have no plans to make any, but just out of curiosity. If it is the first widget to be made this way, that would add a level of interest (OK, I am a geek) to an already interesting device.
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rogue_designer
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« Reply #24 on: February 28, 2009, 08:43:14 am »

watch paper,  business cards what ever

duh iam not very bright am i

To be fair, I had no idea what "round business cards" were either.. but I know instantly what a watch paper is...items have names for a reason.

*shrug*

And, while he needs nobody to defend him, insulting Harold (or frankly any regular member) won't get you far here.

Cheers,
RD
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