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Author Topic: Food! Food! Food! The Good, Bad, Ugly, and Tasty steampunk treats and drinks  (Read 85695 times)
Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #550 on: December 09, 2017, 10:11:13 am »

I've recently moved to a new town, and there are no authentic taco places here. A forty minute drive takes me to a Mexican American district and a place called Los Arcos Market that has fantastic tacos, but it isn't a trip that I can make regularly. I might have to make due with those crunchy Old El Paso taco shells.

Sacrilege! Blasphemy! May your Lay tongue turn into Frito!

Seriously, you're much better off making them yourself. It's very easy. Buy or even mail order some Nixtamalized corn "Masa Harina" (Masa flour)  All you need is water, a flat surface and a heavy pan plus some wax paper or a ziploc bag to flatten masa balls. Deep fry if you want to with one of those cheap fryers. But in Central Mexico you don't eat them crispy anyway. Just cook them for 1-2 minutes on a hot flat griddle and roll yourself some soft tacos.

more blasphemy to make your  hair stand on end ...when I was 7 yr  and in standard 1  at school, our class studied Mexico, the teacher made tortilla in class.  She was a very uptight middle aged English woman.  They were  made  from plain flour and water , and cooked in an electric frying pan . In the moment they were quite delicious .  Not so sure I would be so keen on them now.
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« Reply #551 on: December 09, 2017, 04:10:14 pm »

I've recently moved to a new town, and there are no authentic taco places here. A forty minute drive takes me to a Mexican American district and a place called Los Arcos Market that has fantastic tacos, but it isn't a trip that I can make regularly. I might have to make due with those crunchy Old El Paso taco shells.

Sacrilege! Blasphemy! May your Lay tongue turn into Frito!

Seriously, you're much better off making them yourself. It's very easy. Buy or even mail order some Nixtamalized corn "Masa Harina" (Masa flour)  All you need is water, a flat surface and a heavy pan plus some wax paper or a ziploc bag to flatten masa balls. Deep fry if you want to with one of those cheap fryers. But in Central Mexico you don't eat them crispy anyway. Just cook them for 1-2 minutes on a hot flat griddle and roll yourself some soft tacos.

more blasphemy to make your  hair stand on end ...when I was 7 yr  and in standard 1  at school, our class studied Mexico, the teacher made tortilla in class.  She was a very uptight middle aged English woman.  They were  made  from plain flour and water , and cooked in an electric frying pan . In the moment they were quite delicious .  Not so sure I would be so keen on them now.

Well there's nothing wrong with using an electric frying pan. It's not like people still kneel on the floor tending the fire under a table made from stone slabs (Comal) . Modern life requires modern implements. The normal way is a thin metal plate (steel Comal) or griddle over a gas or electric burner... I normally use a frying pan.

Flour is not wrong either. It's all about the proper context. The right stuff in the right tortilla. The Spanish brought wheat flour, and the wheat flour tortilla became a staple in Northern Mexico. Americans latched on to that and that is the ancestor of the American "Burrito" which basically is an oversize soft taco with flour tortilla. To-date both types of tortilla are available even in Central and Southern Mexico, with the flour tortilla being used mostly for breakfast, that is, serving the warm flour tortillas along with scrambled eggs mixed with shredded dry beef (machaca) or crumbled fried chorizo. Missing perhaps a bit of grease for the tortilla.

When making flour tortillas you'll need some lard or vegetable shortening for the dough, and oil for the pan; unlike maize Masa which needs no oil at all and no shortening of any kind. UNLESS, OF COURSE, the use oil is by design to make the thick tortilla-like Sopes or crispy tortillas as an appetizer. .
« Last Edit: December 09, 2017, 05:18:10 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged

J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #552 on: December 09, 2017, 05:34:43 pm »

And regarding those mixed wheat flour and maize tortilla monsters, the first time I heard from them was a couple of years ago. When I tasted one it carried a bit of the hominy maize flavour, but was moist like a flour tortilla. Didn't hate it but you understand that's definitely not an original.

The reason I think the Americans did that it's because it's nigh impossible to find less than a day-old tortillas in the US. Maize (Masa /hominy) tortillas are meant to be made the same day before the meal, and kept warm an moist inside a container of some sort or in a wrap of cloth. Hominy paste is extremely prone to drying very fast, and there's nothing worse than chewing on a rubbery and hard piece of tortilla.

The problem is that modern supermarkets want to store bread for several days, and that simply doesn't work with maize tortillas. The Americans ended up adding guar gum to make them pliable after the first day, but in return the tortillas are crumbly and gummy throughout their entire shelf life. I challenge you to roll a taco with a cold American tortilla. It's impossible,as it will break and crumble in your hand.

So Americans know and understand the flour tortilla, but SUCK at making and selling maize tortillas. The latest attempt is to genetically merge both...

It's partly because of modern life, but partly because of culture values. Some older Americans may still remember that milk was delivered to the house by the milk man. Well, it's kind of the same mentality with Mexican bread. Someone would go to the "Tortilleria" and pick a freshly made wax paper wrap with 20, 30, 50, or however many tortillas you needed that day. It was a daily exercise.

Same with the 19th C French-Mex bread, the Mexicans have mini Baguette rolls called "Bolillos" (pronounce the "ll" as a "y"). This is a daily staple in Central Mexico. All restaurants and eateries offer them as appetizers, and it's the daily bread of the poor. An alternative is a flat Ciabatta shaped roll made also like a baguette, that is called "Telera" the preferred bread for making "Tortas", the Mexican version of sandwiches. We owe that to the French. Since the 19th century, and throughout the 20th C you'd see men and women carrying baskets full of bread from house to house selling individual units. Or again someone would pass by the baker every day before the meal. It had to be done this way. Anyone who knows French Baguette bread know how hard the crust will get in one day. The shelf life of classical French Baguette bread is one day. No more. Same with tortillas-that's meant to be "daily bread"
« Last Edit: December 09, 2017, 06:01:53 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #553 on: December 10, 2017, 09:05:55 am »



 In New Zealand, a small island nation in the lower South Pacific, Mexican food is relatively recent  arrival.    They are manufactured  here in bakeries, for the most part run by owners and staff from the Indian subcontinent.  Tortilla, taco, burrito  and similar wraps come in plastic  bags with an extended use by date  of a few months.  They come in different flavours. 

 The best  ones I ever had were  put together  by an older fireman friend down the station.  He added potatoes.
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« Reply #554 on: December 11, 2017, 10:00:07 am »



 In New Zealand, a small island nation in the lower South Pacific, Mexican food is relatively recent  arrival.    They are manufactured  here in bakeries, for the most part run by owners and staff from the Indian subcontinent.  Tortilla, taco, burrito  and similar wraps come in plastic  bags with an extended use by date  of a few months.  They come in different flavours.  

 The best  ones I ever had were  put together  by an older fireman friend down the station.  He added potatoes.

It will take some time, I'm sure, but I've heard of expatriates going as far as Sweden to establish their downtown-style diners and eateries. The trick is that even expatriates won't know the whole repertoire - for that you need a real foodie, and even then, you have to make sure the business is viable. Mexico is a big country. You can't offer all the regional dishes and expect to turn a profit in a new market.

I consider that Asians in general will be able to put together Mexican food rather easily. Many foods were shared during the age of Spanish and Portuguese discovery. For sure Mangoes and Cinnamon came from Asia, Bananas from Africa as well as Tamarind which then moved to India.

All Chile peppers, Maize and Avocadoes come from Mexico, as well as Tomatoes (that's fight talk to Italians, but undeniable history). Potatoes (Sorry Irish and Germans) they come from South America by way of Mexico. Peanuts? From South America, also by way of Mexico - this should start a shouting match in a Thai restaurant, and possibly forced eviction from the premises - let alone Cocoa as well from Central America.  I'm not sure how aware people in Asia are about the true origin of many of their foods. Bottom line is that all the traditional Mexican ingredients in any dish are available in copious amounts in Asia, and by consequence Australasia. You just need to get used to making maize hominy and turn it into a thick paste - because you are going be using an awful lot of it - unless you find a reliable importer of dried masa (flour).

The trick is understanding the cooking tradition in Mexican food. The food is like their people, an amalgam of native and European roots. The Mexicans are no longer conquered Aztec, but the children of Aztec and Spanish, hence their food culture looks unabashedly Western. But I fear the execution would involve a learning curve for those people you mention, in part because the methods of preparation and presentation of Asian foods differ significantly from Western foods.

The three main components of Mexican Cuisine are: 1) native foods and methods (maize/ primitive flat bread and steamed cakes from Nixtamalised maize a/k/a hominy, plus sauces made from, chile peppers, avocado, tomato, and cocoa. 2) Renaissance Era European and Mediterranean foods and preservation methods (eg pork, sausage, chicken, pasta). 3) Modern Era (19th. C) Continental European (e.g. Austrian/French/Italian bread, pastries, desserts, cream-based sauces).

The first two components comprise 85-90% of the food that people around the world know about Mexico, in part because Mexican food is defined (and artificially confined) as fast food outside of Mexico. The remainder 15% is basically unknown outside of Mexico, even in the "best" Mexican restaurants in the United States and around the world.

If you have an understanding of the latter 2 roots in the cuisine (Renaissance and 19th C Western cuisine), it should be easy for anyone in Australasia to learn about the former root (Native) side from cook books, history books, etc, and then reproduce Mexican food. The only thing missing is information, really. I would assume it's much harder to cook Mexican food in the UK than it is in Australia, just based on the availability of ingredients. I'm assuming New Zealand should also have the same types of foods found in Australia.
« Last Edit: December 11, 2017, 10:21:26 am by J. Wilhelm » Logged
yereverluvinunclebert
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« Reply #555 on: January 10, 2018, 10:27:09 am »

Tortillas, tacos, burritos - all very nice - we need a steampunk slant for it to stay here (or a new thread for the general food chat) but regardless it will need a steampunk slant. Burritos with chicken and clock parts. Rubber Tacos cooked using  steam. Tortillas manufactured by big brass machines. Those are ideas not recommendations.
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Steampunk Widgets and Icons of Some Worldwide Repute
chicar
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« Reply #556 on: July 02, 2018, 04:14:49 pm »

Look At What I Found On Instagram:
https://www.instagram.com/p/Bkuu6Apl1p8/?utm_source=ig_share_sheet&igshid=bnxtu2zvz5g8
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The word pagan came from paganus , who mean peasant . Its was a way to significate than christianism was the religion of the elite and paganism the one of the savage worker class.

''Trickster shows us how we trick OURSELVES. Her rampant curiosity backfires, but, then, something NEW is discovered (though usually not what She expected)! This is where creativity comes from—experiment, do something different, maybe even something forbidden, and voila! A breakthrough occurs! Ha! Ha! We are released! The world is created anew! Do something backwards, break your own traditions, the barrier breaks; destroy the world as you know it, let the new in.''
Extract of the Dreamflesh article ''Path of The Sacred Clown''
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #557 on: July 02, 2018, 09:10:59 pm »

Tortillas, tacos, burritos - all very nice - we need a steampunk slant for it to stay here (or a new thread for the general food chat) but regardless it will need a steampunk slant. Burritos with chicken and clock parts. Rubber Tacos cooked using  steam. Tortillas manufactured by big brass machines. Those are ideas not recommendations.

Unfortunately, this thread is very old. If you care to look at the entries for the past few years, you'll notice a majority of posts are not even Steampunk related.

What I'd suggest is simply renaming the Food thread to reflect that fact and then start a new thread specifically named for food with gears and clock parts in it if that is the aim.

Like the field of Music, I'm afraid that Cuisine is very ill defined when it comes to Steampunk. I believe we have Steampunks who play music, but there is no such thing as Steampunk music as a genre. At best you have several genres of music that are "ambientally Steampunk."

Likewise, there is no such thing as Steampunk Food. Whenever we talk about Steampunk food, either we are taking about cakes and muffins decorated with cogs or we are taking about genuine Victorian recipes and food practices, which is not really Steampunk, but more re-enactment.

Our own Victorian Brands thread is not even Steampunk! It's historical!
« Last Edit: July 02, 2018, 11:14:49 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #558 on: July 02, 2018, 09:29:28 pm »


It looks really convincing from the outside. Is that a very shiny and smooth chocolate cover? Also to me it looks like a Spanish custard AKA Flan with caramel sauce filling.
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #559 on: July 04, 2018, 09:41:38 am »



Does the " glue a cog on it"  premise transfer to food?
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #560 on: July 05, 2018, 02:07:41 am »



Does the " glue a cog on it"  premise transfer to food?

Why yes, yes it does unfortunately. That is precisely the problem there is no substance or thesis outside of decorative gears in the concept of Steampunk food, other than perhaps references to absynthe, kraken, squid and octopus! The only alternative is Victorian food, so most people will either "glue the gears" or open the Victorian cookbook.
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #561 on: July 05, 2018, 12:15:27 pm »



Does the " glue a cog on it"  premise transfer to food?

Why yes, yes it does unfortunately. That is precisely the problem there is no substance or thesis outside of decorative gears in the concept of Steampunk food, other than perhaps references to absynthe, kraken, squid and octopus! The only alternative is Victorian food, so most people will either "glue the gears" or open the Victorian cookbook.

Which reminds me of a dreadfully awful old joke -

What's the worst thing about eating steampunk food...

... Getting bits of cog caught between your teeth
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chicar
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« Reply #562 on: July 21, 2018, 04:28:40 pm »

A Pinterest Page I Made Dedicated To Retropunk/Mostly Steampunk And Dieselpunk Friendly Food:
https://pin.it/nuisqyr2vrdsy6
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #563 on: July 22, 2018, 02:37:45 am »




 Your page has interesting and artistic permutations
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chicar
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« Reply #564 on: August 02, 2018, 05:33:22 pm »

Rhum And Coke Dispenser:
http://9gag.com/gag/aR3Wz2j
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RJBowman
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« Reply #565 on: August 02, 2018, 07:44:57 pm »

Rhum And Coke Dispenser:
http://9gag.com/gag/aR3Wz2j


I would expect the Coke to corrode the pipes and pick up a copper flavor. I would also expect the carbonation pressure to block the flow of the whisky.

I saw a machine at a restaurant supply trade show that dispensed frozen rum and coke; basically an alcoholic slurpee machine. The chill seemed to bring out all of the bitter flavors, which I didn't much care for. Conceptually, it was a fantastic idea, and would be great if the right liquor/soda combination could be found.
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #566 on: August 02, 2018, 10:44:12 pm »

Rhum And Coke Dispenser:
http://9gag.com/gag/aR3Wz2j


I would expect the Coke to corrode the pipes and pick up a copper flavor. I would also expect the carbonation pressure to block the flow of the whisky.

I saw a machine at a restaurant supply trade show that dispensed frozen rum and coke; basically an alcoholic slurpee machine. The chill seemed to bring out all of the bitter flavors, which I didn't much care for. Conceptually, it was a fantastic idea, and would be great if the right liquor/soda combination could be found.


That is taking tacky  up a level
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RJBowman
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« Reply #567 on: August 03, 2018, 03:50:55 am »

No. Not tacky. Slurpee/Icee is a great culinary innovation; carbonated frozen liquid drink; a combination of many fine things. The machine was invented by the owner of a Dairy Queen ice cream parlor. He had been selling semi-frozen bottles of Coke out of a freezer chest and got the idea to modify a soft-serve ice cream machine to be able to handle carbonation. Adding alcohol is yet another refinement to this fine invention. Progress marches on.
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Hurricane Annie
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« Reply #568 on: August 03, 2018, 09:19:13 am »

No. Not tacky. Slurpee/Icee is a great culinary innovation; carbonated frozen liquid drink; a combination of many fine things. The machine was invented by the owner of a Dairy Queen ice cream parlor. He had been selling semi-frozen bottles of Coke out of a freezer chest and got the idea to modify a soft-serve ice cream machine to be able to handle carbonation. Adding alcohol is yet another refinement to this fine invention. Progress marches on.

 That is an interesting story of invention
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Melrose
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« Reply #569 on: September 19, 2018, 12:39:59 pm »

For whatever help this may be, at a local Steampunk fair last weekend, one stall was selling what I presume the world knows as "Berliners" (Berliner Pfannkuchen is the full name, Google tells me). Donuts, without holes, but filled with jam or custard.
In this case, fresh, unfilled Berliners came with a plastic hypodermic full of custard. Take a bite, inject some custard, bite, inject, and repeat.
It worked for us, but I suppose there is a risk that a dog may sit at your feet, either begging for some, or alerting his drug squad handler to the syringe.
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Banfili
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« Reply #570 on: September 19, 2018, 01:23:11 pm »

Best we can do in my neck of the woods is Taco Bills - and that's nearly 70 kms away, and generally not worth the effort!
As for things stuffed with custard and or cream, the Yakandandah Bakery a couple of valleys over used to make the best ever Bavarian Creams - ever! Cheesy
« Last Edit: September 19, 2018, 01:25:17 pm by Banfili » Logged
J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #571 on: September 19, 2018, 08:39:32 pm »

For whatever help this may be, at a local Steampunk fair last weekend, one stall was selling what I presume the world knows as "Berliners" (Berliner Pfannkuchen is the full name, Google tells me). Donuts, without holes, but filled with jam or custard.
In this case, fresh, unfilled Berliners came with a plastic hypodermic full of custard. Take a bite, inject some custard, bite, inject, and repeat.
It worked for us, but I suppose there is a risk that a dog may sit at your feet, either begging for some, or alerting his drug squad handler to the syringe.

They call them "Bismarks" in my neck of the woods  Tongue  But no. I will not buy a Bismark / Berliner with a plastic syringe.

In Mexico the latest fad is to have chocolate custard and goat-milk caramel sauce filled Churros

« Last Edit: September 19, 2018, 08:42:12 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
Mercury Wells
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« Reply #572 on: September 20, 2018, 04:01:54 am »

For whatever help this may be, at a local Steampunk fair last weekend, one stall was selling what I presume the world knows as "Berliners" (Berliner Pfannkuchen is the full name, Google tells me). Donuts, without holes, but filled with jam or custard.
In this case, fresh, unfilled Berliners came with a plastic hypodermic full of custard. Take a bite, inject some custard, bite, inject, and repeat.
It worked for us, but I suppose there is a risk that a dog may sit at your feet, either begging for some, or alerting his drug squad handler to the syringe.

We just call them "Jam Doughnuts" or "Custard Doughtnuts". They're deep fried then covered in caster suger & then filled with either or custard, before selling.

« Last Edit: September 20, 2018, 04:07:20 am by Mercury Wells » Logged

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RJBowman
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« Reply #573 on: September 20, 2018, 07:22:55 pm »

In Michigan and most of the upper eastern midwest, they are called jelly donuts, custard donuts, or (custard filled only) bismarcks. Jelly filled are sometimes rolled in sugar or topped with frosting. Custard filled or bismarck's usually have chocolate frosting. There are also donuts filled with fluffy whipped vanilla cream, which is a disappointment when you bite into it expecting custard. All types are available at all donut shops, but the best are purchased from small family-owned shops.
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J. Wilhelm
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« Reply #574 on: September 21, 2018, 07:33:53 pm »

In Michigan and most of the upper eastern midwest, they are called jelly donuts, custard donuts, or (custard filled only) bismarcks. Jelly filled are sometimes rolled in sugar or topped with frosting. Custard filled or bismarck's usually have chocolate frosting. There are also donuts filled with fluffy whipped vanilla cream, which is a disappointment when you bite into it expecting custard. All types are available at all donut shops, but the best are purchased from small family-owned shops.


You NEED to show the goods! Pictures, something! Food culture in different parts of the world is very interesting.

Mexicans are completely obsessed with pastries, and after the French came in the late 19th. C, they left a pretty strong tradition of European style pastries and bread which melded with earlier Spanish-Native breads...

ALSO (disclaimer) I totally apologize for inundating you with videos from You Tube (I'm not trying to promote these people or anything), but it just happens that someone is literally filming all those things I remember from childhood.

This is what a pastry shop looks like in Mexico City: It's like a combination between bakery, cake bakery and lunch counter all rolled onto one.

Gringos in a Pastelería (living in historic downtown Mexico City) // Gringos in Mexico City Vlog

« Last Edit: September 21, 2018, 07:39:56 pm by J. Wilhelm » Logged
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