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Author Topic: The Airship Bible  (Read 1738 times)
fmra
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Dollmaker


« on: April 05, 2007, 03:57:22 am »

Airship Design
by Charles P. Burgess
Aeronautical Engineer, Bureau of Aeronautics, United States Navy; Associate Professor of Aeronautical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Copyright 1927

I ordered this book a couple weeks ago through interlibrary loan and it finally arrived today.  After only a cursory glance-through, I have decided that this tome is a magnificent read for anyone who has ever thought of flying in a LTA.  It is a textbook, a history, and a guide to the design, construction, and piloting of airships.  For the benefit of the board I will post, here, the table of contents (to encourage others to find and read this) and a small paraphrased excerpt.  I'm not sure who might still own rights to this book, afterall.  Also, I will attempt to take notes and share them with those who might be interested.  Although I doubt the legality of actual construction of a viable airship (along with a supposed prohibitive monetary cost to the individual), I still have my own dreams.

Table of Contents by Chapter Heading:

1 - The Types of Airships
2 - Size and Performance
3 - Volumes, Areas, and Linear Dimensions
4 - Load, Shear, and Moments
5 - Aerodynamic Forces
6 - Strength of Nonrigid Airships
7 - Longitudinal Strength of Rigid Airships
8 - Gas-Pressure Forces and Transverse Strength
9 - Design of Girders
10 - Steps in Design
11 - Common Airship Fallacies

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Dax
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"That is the Law. Are we not Men?"


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« Reply #1 on: April 05, 2007, 04:11:10 am »

Perhaps there's hope...
http://www.personalblimp.com/
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Blackadder: A man may fight for many things. His country, his friends, his principles, the glistening tear on the cheek of a golden child. But personally, I'd mud-wrestle my own mother for a ton of cash, an amusing clock and a sack of French porn.
Tinkergirl
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« Reply #2 on: April 05, 2007, 10:44:31 am »

Interesting - does it go in to the material used for the envelope?  I've looked in the past for information on that, but other than finding a few mentions of sailcloth being used in a modern hybrid prototype, I don't know what it was that was used.  I'd like to know how they kept helium/hydrogen leakage to a minimum.
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fmra
Snr. Officer
****

Dollmaker


« Reply #3 on: April 05, 2007, 04:05:54 pm »

It does talk about envelope fabric, but does not (as I have yet found) speak directly of fabrics used for rigids.  Pressure airships used three-ply rubberized cotton and metalclads used .008in thick aluminum plating.  For a rigid, the type of material used seems to depend wholly on its lifespan and ability to withstand a great amount of tension without losing elasticity.

Rigids, of course used gas cells made from goldbeater's skin (oxen intestines), so the envelope does not need to be airtight.  Non- and semi rigids used rubberized material to slow down/prevent leakage through the envelope material.  The aluminum of metalclads is 100x better at preventing leakage of lifting gases.
« Last Edit: April 05, 2007, 04:09:39 pm by fmra » Logged
Tinkergirl
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« Reply #4 on: April 05, 2007, 09:27:15 pm »

Wow, goldbeaters skin - I'd not heard of it before you mentioned it.  I wonder how it holds up against 'modern' fabrics and materials.  I'd be interested to know.  After all, it wouldn't do to have intestinal gases getting through, so I suppose it's quite good at preventing leakage.
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Doctor Trakov
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Admiral of the 14th Belogravian Airship Navy


« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2007, 09:32:44 pm »

I have indeed always wanted an airship, and I shall be on the lookout for that book, thank you!
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Chuzzlewit
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Netherlands Netherlands



« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2007, 10:32:29 pm »

Oh my... It's still available new...

It's "print on demand", (i.e. academic paperback format probably with grotty covers) published by the University Press of the Pacific, price through UK booksellers 47.50, and I would LOVE a copy of that...

Please tell us - does it have photographs? Technical drawings?

Thanks.


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"`Suppose, after all, it all ends in your butterflies and morlocks. THAT DOESN'T MATTER NOW. The effort's real. It's worth going on with. It's worth it. It's worth it, even so.' . . .
fmra
Snr. Officer
****

Dollmaker


« Reply #7 on: April 05, 2007, 10:38:31 pm »

Wow, goldbeaters skin - I'd not heard of it before you mentioned it.  I wonder how it holds up against 'modern' fabrics and materials.  I'd be interested to know.  After all, it wouldn't do to have intestinal gases getting through, so I suppose it's quite good at preventing leakage.


Before getting carried away with the virtues of goldbeater's skin, remember that over half a million (500,000) cattle were slaughtered for every zeppelin.  I'd be looking for a modern alternative.

Chuzzlewit:  My copy does, but it is the 1967 xerox reproduction from the original text.  Be aware, though, most of the pictures are math related and some of the math involved is complicated...  but yes Smiley there are some technical drawings too.
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